School and Esports

By Elijah Bush.

With video games becoming a rapidly growing franchise over the last decade, need for online competition has increased. From this came electronic sports (Esports), also known as competitive gaming. Most gaming leagues are private, self-established clubs, but not many schools participated in this. Many colleges have scholarship opportunities for competitive gamers. In addition, is great with team building.

Colleges such as Indiana Tech, University of California, University of Utah, and many others are offering scholarships to players. These help one pay for college by participating in Esport college championships. Getting money for having fun sounds great. Why don’t students prepare ahead of time and compete at a high school level to get scholarships?

Video games are great for friendships and team building. Playing online with others creates a social experience like no other. Everyone using their brains to figure out how to beat the enemy team, contributing under pressure, coming up with plans on the spot, all very effective ways of connecting with each other. The online world is a great way to make friends and develop social skills.

There are growing Esport competitions with many different genres, the main four being First Person Shooters, Real Time Strategy, Multi Online Battle Arena, and Battle Royale. All of these group have many games, all gaining popularity in the competitive gaming community. In 2017, 60 million people watched the League of Legends tournament, and there were 173,000 attendees at the Counter-Strike Global Offensive final held in Poland. With Esports becoming  a more prominent way of visual entertainment, companies have made their own leagues to compete. These groups, such as The North American League Championship Series (NALCS) and The Overwatch league, both compete in tournaments for the game they specialize in. With all these groups why isn’t there a league for video games’ main demographic, high school students?

Esports has grown quickly on a global level, but has struggled to make its way to the high school platform. With the new scholarship opportunities in competitive gaming, the social interaction, and the growing enterprise of online competitive play, it will only be a matter of time before Esports comes to the school platform.

 

 References

Bogage, Jacob. “Arizona will offer high school esports, including a state championship.”

   https://www.washingtonpost.com, http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2018/08/23/

   arizona-will-offer-high-school-esports-including-a-state-championship/

   ?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0ef184f2f46f. Accessed 16 Sept. 2018.

“esports.” explained, season 1, episode 8, Netflix, 27 June 2018.

“Esports Scholarships / Scholarships for Gamers.” https://www.scholarships.com, scholarships.com,

   www.scholarships.com/financial-aid/college-scholarships/sports-scholarships/

   esports-scholarships-scholarships-for-gamers/. Accessed 16 Sept. 2018.

“Why Esports in High Schools?” https://www.highschoolesportsleague.com,

   www.highschoolesportsleague.com/why-esports-in-high-school/. Accessed 16 Sept. 2018.

 

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